Introduce yourself

Hi everyone!

I’m Genesis, System Engineer from Venezuela. This is my firts “formal” contact with QA learning. I’m so excited because I always have tested things, but actually has been by intuition, not with appropiate tools and skills.

And now, I’m going to learn properly and that’s awesome!!

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Welcome! Actually a well developed intuition is a very important test skill. But the tools are needed to specify the problems.

Super exicted to be here! So hello, I’m Kristof, test automator & performance tester from Belgium. I live and breathe testing. I enjoy coaching & teaching others. I’ve always been into testing from since I was 15 and prefer to keep myself busy with Webservice Testing & API / Web App Security. So I’m happy to help out with any questions and ready to learn some new stuff myself!

Kind regards
Kristof

Hi everyone!
I’m Diana, the new EventBoss at Ministry of Testing! I’ve joined the MoT family in January this year and, coming from an events background, I decided to take this course to understand better what testing is about, so I can get more involved with the community and deliver better TestBashes and trainings for our amazing community!
And of course, thanks @mwinteringham and @danashby for putting up such a great course together! :slight_smile:

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Hi, my name is michael. I am currently in my final year of A levels and i would like to be a tester after i leave college.

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Thanks for the nice welcome. My name is Kerstin, I just recently started working in software testing and documentation in a “real” and professional department for quality assurance in an IT organisation in Austria. “Real” because prior to that I had a job in a very small IT company, where I kind of did software testing too, but mixed with a lot of other jobs like project management, product management and support. All in all my main job there was problem solving. That’s how I discovered my interest and curiosity for software testing.

I would describe myself as a lifelong learner, problem solver and very curious. That’s what led me to the this site. I am looking forward to learn about software testing in general and specifically about automation.

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Hello everyone. My name is Rodolfo, I’m a historian, however I love learning, and I’ve always been interested in software, so that’s why enrolled in this course.

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Hello everyone,
my name is Petra. I’m a software quality engineer for tech corporation in Prague and most of my testing knowledge comes from almost 3 years of experience. Therefore I would like to get some theoretical basics and once I’m oriented in the courses here, specialize more in automation.
Thank you for the welcome and I hope you are all well :slight_smile:

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Hi Christ
It is really nice to see a KIWI here, I am from New Zealand

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Hi Everyone

This is Grace, I just transfer to QA position recently, before I am a product owner, one reason I like to be a tester is that I can explore the product and anything I do not know, I can think about how the things should be freedom.

Great to be here

thanks!

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This has been a busy week for newcomers. Welcome Everybody!

Kia Ora Grace!
Great to see another Kiwi in The Club.
I hope your social distancing is going well :slight_smile:

Hi.

I am Murat from London and a recent CS graduate. I’ve been in testing industry for two years now and currently working as a freelance tester and studying for ISTQ exam. It’s great to be here. Thanks.

Hi everyone!

My name is Graça, I transfer to QA position as tester. I like the idea of checking up on the product before it gets to the users hands, but I want to learn more! Thanks for the videos, they are looking good :smiley:

Great to be here

thanks!

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Hello,

My name is Justin, I have been in the tech industry for almost one year now. I am a QA tester for a cyber security firm. Looking forward to building more skills and movin on up in this industry. Good luck to everyone :slight_smile:

Take care

I am currently into project management and looking for a career change. Just started with this course to know about testing. Planning to take ISTQB certification later. I will be grateful for any tips and guidance to get a testing job.

Hello!
My name is Kim and I am super excited to be here among all of you great people who have a love for software. I’m not quite sure when I developed MY love for software but I did and there’s no going back now! lol. Very hopeful for all of the great lessons and instruction I will receive through this course.

Hi,

I am a consultant in software testing. A few months ago a started my first project at the IT department of a bank. Unfortunately, the project does not meet my expectations. It is a slow environment and testing is done in an old-fashioned way. Now I want to develop myself further in testing and see what else is possible. I also hope to refresh the basics of testing with this course.
I am already enthusiastic

  • Marissa

hi jennf,
I am anagha and also working in the field of SW tetsting for healthcare applications.
Would like to hera from your testign approach , strategy used for medical SW.
we r into medical devices and also medical sw
thanx
anagha

Marissa,

There are some regulated business sectors which require “old-fashioned” software testing, for due diligence reasons, especially a need to have cast-iron audit trails. Medical systems is one such area; finance is another. This usually involves manual script execution with detailed lists of test results achieved. That’s just the way it is.

That isn’t to say that more modern test techniques - exploratory testing in particular - can’t be used as well. Even if your organisation doesn’t work on an agile basis and so you are waiting for new releases to be thrown “over the wall”, that doesn’t mean that you can’t do some exploratory work on earlier versions, or on versions with known bugs that you can avoid to see what else is, or isn’t working, and how well. Finding bugs that are off the ‘happy path’ but still have a better-than-medium risk of occurring in deployment will add value to the product (in avoiding rework later) and demonstrate the value of more flexible testing approaches.