How to store and manage session notes (in confluence)?

How can I store session notes on confluence and make them easily manageable?

Currently, I am writing the session notes on google docs, save the file in .txt format then upload it to Confluence.
This is not the most efficient process, it can take some time. At the end of it all, the text file within confluence is not easily linked to a Jira ticket.

Here are my suggestions:
Make a Jira ticket/template to use as a session note.
Make a new confluence page for every session note.
simply attach the file as a link

What I want from this process (not in any particular order):
I want the notes to be easily linked to jira tickets
I want the notes to be easily converted to .txt files
I want to search these notes easily to look for relevant information in them, and for my own reflection.

I am open to hear about your processes in managing session notes, and what you have found to work for you.

Thanks.

3 Likes

Why not instantly write them in confluence?
Here are some markdown tips & tricks: https://confluence.atlassian.com/doc/confluence-wiki-markup-251003035.html

You can have a JIRA integration with your confluence, so you can link Tickets in confluence also so you’ll have a direct link towards a specific ticket. Even better you can also show Query results so if you have a feature with lots of user stories linked to it, you can show them all on that page. It’s very Dynamic also, so if you add a new user story in your JIRA, it will automatically be updated into your confluence page also. So no micromanagement/updating several places.

=> https://confluence.atlassian.com/doc/integrating-jira-and-confluence-2825.html

Some examples of JIRA issue macro’s: https://confluence.atlassian.com/doc/jira-issues-macro-139380.html

3 Likes

I would say old habits that must be unlearned; this updating several places is not working.
Thanks for the links, I will have a look at them.

1 Like

:stuck_out_tongue:

On one of my previous projects where we used JIRA & Confluence, The Integration was a super feature. We had not only our notes in there but also the fully written features/user stories (So the analysis, technical & non-technical) etc. It was so easy to go from a JIRA ticket to the correct confluence page and back & always having a complete overview of all related issues (tickets in jira)

I would definitely recommend it

1 Like

I recently tired of using excel to capture test results and sessions, and also just write it into confluence now. I drop links to each jira in as I go, and stow all the screenshots in the jira tickets if they are bugs, and leave them in confluence if they are just observational screenshots. I’m not sure who prompted me to stop using text files, they are such a faff.

I do wish we could easily store entire videos, but that just costs effort, although it’s the future of testing to just do it in video.

Some possible reasons for documenting session notes in Confluence are:

  • knowledge transfer
  • compliance
  • something else.

Depending on the need of the testing notes the right solution can be chosen.

In one company I added my testing notes to the Jira tickets. If an auditor would check my work, then he, she or they could read my notes whether I folllowed the proper procedures. The auditor did not need to jump to another system to validate my steps.

My scrum master questioned my approach. A word processor had to be used and then the document had to be scanned. So this was not helpful. I added notes in the remarks field of the Jira ticket. Over time the developers copied this: they used bullet list and markers to indicate wheter a certain test had passed or failed.

2 Likes

I begin to wonder about the master bit there, efficiency. But that’s not the point there, since any proof that testing was planned or was just executed, counts in an audit even if its done in notepad or as a large .MP4 file.

1 Like

True! Never seen a .MP4 file though :stuck_out_tongue:
Perhaps there was a company policy about using a word processor so they could integrate / upload it to some other system.

1 Like