What would you say to yourself if you were to start learning about software testing today?


(Samuel) #1

Hello everyone,

When I started to work with software testing, I had some chooses, based on my knowledge at the moment. And today?

With your experience, and mindset, if you could say to yourself what to learn about testing and how to start, what would you say?

Let’s share :slight_smile:

Starting by me: I would like to say: “Learn more about Agile Testing and continuous improvement.”


(Chris) #2

Run. Become a reclusive author and live a life of wine and typewriters.


(Heather) #3

:joy: That is incredibly specific!

I don’t think I would change anything about my path so far to be honest. The struggles I had finding useful resources were what led me to write 30 Things Every New Software Tester Should Learn.

If I was to give any advice it would be:

  • Go with your gut
  • It’s okay to second guess yourself but don’t third guess yourself
  • Pick your battles
  • If you’ve had a hard day, it’s okay to be reclusive and grab a glass of wine
  • Mind your physical health, learning can wait, RSI from keyboard usage will stop you

(Robert) #4

Ah, kinofrost, I tried that. I had to get into testing to make enough money to keep me in wine :blush:


(Cassandra) #5

I think we’ve both been lucky / proactive in forging good paths for ourselves early on. I found the testing community and MoT very quickly because I went looking for it, but most people don’t; at least not until much later in their careers.

My advice isn’t so much for my past self as it is for others (and I do often give this advice!):

  1. Get involved in the community
  2. Join Twitter and follow testers, developers, POs, anyone involved in software development who shares thought-provoking posts

Note: You don’t have to agree with people on Twitter to follow them. Expose yourself to people you disagree with, or who often shed light on alternative perspectives to yours. Being challenged and exposed to diversity helps us grow immensely both as testers and people.

That being said, I’ve been a professional tester for less than two years, so perhaps I’ll come up with some advice for myself as I continue developing. I’m already speaking at conferences, have my own blog, and am often asked to write for others or appear as a guest (proof that success doesn’t depend on how long you’ve been in testing!) but I know there’s a lot more to learn. That’s one of my favourite things about being a tester :slight_smile: